State rejects pedestrian traffic monitoring plan for Cranberry Lake Bridge – news – New Jersey Herald

BYRAM – On the eve of a fundraiser tonight to support the restoration of the Cranberry Lake walkway, the State Department of Environmental Protection has rejected a proposal to reopen the bridge at designated times with surveillance.

BYRAM – On the eve of a fundraiser tonight to support the restoration of the Cranberry Lake walkway, the State Department of Environmental Protection has rejected a proposal to reopen the bridge at designated times with surveillance.

The Cranberry Lake Community Club has proposed to DEP – the entity to which the club leases the bridge – that the 88-year-old catwalk be reopened at specific times with surveillance during beach season, the club president said, Mary Seage. Seaage said the club will employ monitors at each end, with a flag system to facilitate foot traffic.

One of the DEP stipulations at the club before the bridge closed in June was that foot traffic could be allowed if the club could limit pedestrian activity to a maximum of four people at a time.

In an email to DEP on June 21, Seage said the club are offering a surveillance system with red and green flags, to alert pedestrians on the bridge when it would be appropriate to cross, and not to exceed the maximum. four people at a time.

Seaage said the DEP rejected the idea by email on Wednesday, without any explanation.

In early June, Seage said, DEP officials asked him why the signage was not posted on the bridge for a limit of four people. Seaage informed the DEP that the club was seeking advice from its insurance company. From there, Seage said, the DEP contacted her about a week later to close the bridge. The bridge has since remained closed indefinitely.

DEP spokesperson Caryn Shinske said Thursday the department was working on a response to the New Jersey Herald’s request for comment on the matter.

According to the last lease signed between DEP and the club, dated 1990, the club rents the catwalk and the land adjacent to the DEP. In addition to the club’s annual rental payments of $ 650, the club has accepted responsibility for the wooden components of the bridge and metal safety rails, coordinating twice-yearly bridge inspections and snow removal and ice. DEP agreed to maintain the steel and concrete elements of the bridge.

Seage said the club were reluctant to re-sign the lease with the DEP due to the condition of the bridge, which during inspections in 2002 and 2009 returned with poor or unsatisfactory ratings. Seaage said the bridge passed its last inspection before 2002. In 2016, the club carried out its own bridge inspection and the DEP carried out inspections in 2017 and 2018. The 2018 DEP inspection involved a dive team.

With DEP claiming bridge repair costs would exceed $ 1 million, with the club believed to be responsible for 70% of that, a group of Cranberry Lake residents, including Seage, founded Save Our Bridge, a 501 (c ) (3). Seage said the club was not eligible to apply for grants, but Save Our Bridge can, as well as collect tax-deductible donations. To date, Save Our Bridge has raised over $ 25,000.

Whiskey tasting to raise funds for the repair of a bridge

Tonight, Save Our Bridge is hosting “Bourbon for the Bridge” starting at 8 p.m. at the Cranberry Lake Clubhouse, 268 Route 206, which is open to the general public. For attendees aged 21 and over, the $ 40 per person whiskey tasting event includes a presentation by whiskey connoisseur Chess Lankford. Each participant will discover six bourbons and will benefit from a convivial buffet.

Participation in the event requires prior registration. To attend, visit the events section of the organization’s website, www.saveourbridge.net.

Jennifer Jean Miller can also be reached by phone at: 973-383-1230; and on Facebook: www.Facebook.com/JMillerNJH.


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